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On the Carpet: Style, Personalization and Care

There was a time when choosing carpet for your home meant picking out an unassuming, neutral tone like white, beige or gray and laying it throughout the house. Today, consumers often venture beyond the safe choices of the past and look to their carpet as an opportunity to make a statement.

“Regardless of the fiber, they want a look that is personalized,” says Teresa Tran, director of soft surface portfolio management, residential, for carpet and flooring manufacturer Shaw, Inc. And, Tran says, that’s not necessarily about whether you prefer loop pile, cut-pile Berber, or another common carpet style. While no one type of carpet stands out as a trend, Tran says, Shaw has found that consumers are looking for a full range of colors to choose from and carpet that is durable, easy to clean, and stays looking like new.

“We’re seeing a big trend in patterns, small-scale solid or something that is very bold,” Tran says. With less focus on uniform carpeting throughout the home, Tran says, homeowners are more willing to go with a bolder pattern in high-traffic areas like the bedroom and family room. That might mean a traditional pin dot, diamond, or geometric pattern with some variation, Tran says.

The preference for personalization has led carpet manufacturers to change their approach as well, Tran says. “It used to be that we would develop products on capacity, fiber types,” she says. “Today, we’re doing it differently, trying to understand what the consumer needs. The way carpet is manufactured today, I don’t think a consumer has to go for a specific style. It’s okay to take chances in patterns and visual.”

With hard surfaces trending, many consumers are also opting to put rugs in as a way to personalize their space. Most types of carpet can be customized into rugs, Tran says.

If the look of the carpet reflects your personality, the type of carpet construction and fiber you select should be based on lifestyle, foot traffic, how much you use the room and for what purpose. If you have pets or children, for example, you probably want a carpet that is stain resistant and durable. The carpet manufacturer and retailer will likely have some suggestions based on your needs. Take a look at this primer from the Carpet and Rug Institute:

  • Cut pile: Known for durability, good for high-traffic areas
  • Textured plush: Good for busy households, hides vacuum and foot marks well
  • Saxony: Ideal for interior rooms.
  • Frieze: Curly texture that minimizes footprints and vacuum marks
  • Plush: Dense and luxurious. Better for low-traffic, formal areas of the home
  • Loop pile: Loops at uniform height, common with Berber styles
  • Cut-loop pile: Combines cut and looped yarns for a varied texture, adept at hiding soil and stains

Whether you prefer a bold color, busy pattern or understated neutral tone, all carpets and rugs need regular and proper vacuuming. The style of carpet you choose will affect the way you vacuum.

A common misconception is that all carpets and all vacuum cleaners are the same, says Rob Green, senior design engineer with Dyson. Check the use and care manual or manufacturer’s recommendations for your model vacuum to see whether it is an appropriate choice for cleaning your carpet.

Here are some other factors to consider when vacuuming your carpet that will help keep it looking like the day it was installed:

Style of carpet matters more than materials: “The material the carpet fibers are made from does not affect the vacuuming techniques as much as the construction of the carpet,” Green says. Tuft and weave are important to consider when vacuuming. “The depth of the pile and length of each tuft, the construction of the backing, and the bonding between the piles and the backing should drive vacuuming technique more than material.” This means a cut pile, deep/long, twisted tuft may be more susceptible to fuzzing or fraying if it is cleaned with a rotating brush bar than a short, looped pile, regardless of the material. Consult the carpet’s use and care manual for specific recommendations.

Choose the right height: Generally, deeper carpets and longer piles require greater penetration from the vacuum’s bristles for better cleaning, Green says. However, he adds, it is important to know the recommended cleaning of the flooring to ensure the carpet is suitable for cleaning with and will not be damaged by a rotating brush bar.

Is a robot doing the work? Robotic vacuums have seen countless innovations and improvements in the more than two decades since they first hit the market. However, Green says, they still call for a different approach than conventional vacuums. Robots may be less adept at cleaning certain surfaces. “The deeper and thicker a carpet, the more resistance it will give the robot, potentially making it harder for the robot to move,” Green says. “Also, consider that the robot is working on an algorithm and will not detect delicate surfaces such as rugs that might now be suitable for cleaning with a rotating brush bar.”

Need for speed: Consider the type of carpet when you’re choosing your speed setting. When you are vacuuming thick or deep pile carpets, or carpets with rubber backing, a lack of airflow could cause the vacuum to limpet down, Green says. “At this point, it may be desirable to reduce the suction power to allow ease of use,” he says. “This will come at the cost of cleaning performance.”

What type of carpet do you prefer? Tell us in the comment section!

Essential vacuum maintenance tips for high-level floor care

Vacuums are like the magician of home appliances. You pass them over the top of some dirt and—presto—it disappears! There’s nothing magic about it, though. Whether you use a canister, stick, upright, central or robotic vacuum, the cleaning power it provides is the result of precision engineering and many parts working together to help you get the upper hand on dirt, dust and allergens.

Vacuums tend to live in closets or under beds, kept out of sight until we need them. Like many appliances, it is easy to take vacuums for granted until you need them and they don’t work. A few simple steps can help ensure that your vacuum continues to make magic!

Change and clean the filter: Failing to clean or change the filter might be the most common reason for low vacuum performance. It’s also one of the easiest to address. Your vacuum’s use and care manual will offer guidance on specific filter replacement, care and cleaning, but make a habit to check the filters on your vacuum regularly for dirt. If you are cleaning a filter, allow it to dry completely before returning it to the vacuum. Keep in mind that your vacuum may have more than one filter, so make sure you are caring for all of them properly.

Empty the bag and canister: Some models include indicators to signal when it is time to change the bag or empty the canister. If yours doesn’t have an indicator, don’t wait until the bag or canister is overflowing. Change the bag or empty the canister when it’s one-half to two-thirds full.

Clean the brush roll: A functioning brush roll is essential to dislodge dirt and allow it to be picked up by the vacuum. Check it periodically to make sure it hasn’t been wrapped up in hair or blocked by debris, which can put stress on the belt and reduce the vacuum’s performance.

Replace the belt as needed: The belts on vacuums wear over time. As they do, performance diminishes. Plan to have your belt changed every two years. Check your vacuum’s use and care manual for instructions on how to change the belt, or visit an authorized service provider.

A deeper dive into floor care

New puppies are adorable, but they also come with a guaranteed supply of new messes. If you are a proud new puppy owner, you probably already have a good vacuum on hand. That’s good—you’ll need it, regardless of whether your dog sheds seasonally or all year. Since you have added a new pet to your household, it is time to think about bringing in another floor care appliance—the deep cleaner.

You might have memories of tagging along with your mother to the store to pick up a rented deep cleaner in an annual or semi-annual ritual that culminated in a freshly cleaned, new looking carpet that you were banned from walking on for a few hours post-cleaning. Rentals are how most people still handle their carpet cleaning, though businesses and others with heavier carpet-cleaning needs may want to consider purchasing one. They are not just for carpets, either. Some models can be used in your car or on furniture, where stains can also sap some of your home’s shine.

Deep Cleaners vs. Vacuums

You already have a vacuum—maybe even more than one. So why would you need to deep clean your carpets? Vacuums do an effective job of removing loose dirt, dust, debris and allergens, but some dirt and stains are beyond their capabilities. Think stains from a pet, that clumsy neighbor who spills a glass of wine in the center of your brand-new carpet, or that high-traffic area of your home that never quite seems to shine because the dirt is ground in and out of a vacuum’s reach. Deep cleaners can attack all of those.

How often you deep clean will depend on your needs. For some, once a year may be sufficient. You might need to deep clean more frequently if you have pets or a lot of foot traffic in your home. Check with your carpet retailer or manufacturer for specific recommendations on deep cleaning.

Deep Cleaning in Action 

Unlike vacuums, which use suction and sweeping mechanisms to remove dirt, deep cleaners add warm or hot water, plus special cleaning solutions, to get the job done. They use a high-pressure spray or brush to dislodge dirt and break up stains. Different models might offer variable flow rates and multiple attachments for carpets or other surfaces.

It’s important to use a cleaning solution that is made specifically for use in a deep cleaner. The deep cleaner’s use and care manual will offer recommendations for the type and amount of cleaner to use. Follow the manual’s recommendations for use. During the cleaning, you likely will have to move more slowly than you would when vacuuming. Make sure the front edge is touching the ground and that the carpet is making contact with the unit’s brushes. Wait for the carpet to dry before setting foot on it again.

Now you are ready for that new puppy or kitten! However, you may want to leave your clumsy neighbor off the guest list next time.

AHAM’s Top 5 Posts of 2017

Before we jump into 2018, let’s take a moment to revisit our most-read posts from 2017. We covered a wide range of topics, from chef-approved ways to grill indoors, to keeping your home safe after a hurricane. That variety is evident in our top posts of the year.

We are grateful to our readers – thank you for taking the time to click, read and share our content last year! Without further ado, here are your favorite pieces from 2017.

Is your water filter counterfeit? Keep your family safe – learn to spot the signs of counterfeit water filters.

Safety, security, warranty: Why it’s important to have your appliances repaired by authorized providers In the long run, authorized repairs just make sense for you and your appliances.

Kitchen redesigns: Appliances, Cabinets and Space Designer advice on how to balance function and style.

The Facts on PACs and RACs: Should you choose a portable or room air conditioner? AHAM helps you decide what type of air conditioner is best for your home.

5 questions to ask before buying a used appliance These key questions will make you an informed buyer.

Central Vacuums: Built-in floor care

When you think of vacuuming, you may think of pulling your vacuum out of a closet or dragging it up the stairs from the basement.  What if you only had to grab the hose and plug it into an inlet to begin this dusty and daunting task?

Millions of homeowners in the U.S. and Canada rely on their central vacuums to take care of dirt and dust. Central vacuums are built into the home, with the collection unit often placed in the basement, garage or attic. Owners plug the hose into inlets spaced throughout the home and vacuum just as they would with any other vacuum. Multiple attachments and power heads are available.  In some homes, a special kick plate can be installed in areas where crumbs, or dust pile up — such as kitchens — so you can sweep dirt into the opening for it to be sucked into the central collection unit.

If you’re the type of person who likes to keep your floor cleaning power ready to go at the flip of a switch, a central vacuum may be the way to go. We spoke with Natalie Fraser, sales manager with Vacumaid, and Sarah Busch, marketing manager for H-P Products, both AHAM members, to get the story on the benefits of central vacuums and what you need to know if you’re thinking about making the switch from portable to central floor care.

What’s different

Venting: Many central vacuum systems are vented to the outside of your home, meaning there’s a greater chance the dirt, dust and allergens that you vacuum will be completely removed from your immediate living space. The small particles that might make it past the canister are vented outside. While not all systems are vented outside, most manufacturers recommend external venting.

More power: Central vacuums tend to have three to five times more cleaning power than portable vacuums.

Volume: With collection bins that hold 7-9 gallons, central vacuums have a larger capacity than many other types of vacuums.

Ready access: Central vacuums include a number of attachments to allow you to quickly vacuum. Instead of retrieving your vacuum from the closet, you can just flip a switch. Like portable vacuums, central vacuums come with a number of attachments, including retractable hoses, dusting brushes, crevice tools and hardwood floor brushes. Standard hoses are 30 feet, with options for longer hoses up to 50 feet to allow you to reach everywhere dust settles.

Your options

There are several types of central vacuums available. Some models may have central bags, which need to be changed periodically, depending on how often you vacuum. There are also bagless models, for which you’ll have to empty the canister as needed, and cyclonic filter models. In addition, some central vacuums convert to a wet-dry system, which can save the day if your basement floods or your hot water heater bursts. Central vacuums are sized according to the square footage of the home. Ask a retailer what’s best for you.

Installation

Obviously, it’s easiest to install a central vacuum while a home is being built. But they can also be installed in existing homes, provided the walls can be accessed. The process includes placement of the unit and the installation of inlets and piping. The job can usually be done in a day or less.

You probably won’t place an inlet in every room, so think about placing them in or near high-traffic areas in the home or places you’ll vacuum more often than others, like dining rooms, kitchens or living rooms.

Vacuum features, settings and technique: Expert advice

Vacuums are one of your go-to appliances as you strive to keep your home clear of dirt, dust, pet hair and allergens. There’s a good chance vacuuming is part of your daily or weekly routine. A 2013 global survey by AHAM member Electrolux found that 33% of respondents vacuumed 2-5 times per week, 13% vacuumed daily and 3% more than once a day.

How you vacuum, not just how much you vacuum, is an important factor as you strive to conquer household dust. The various settings and features incorporated into many vacuum models, combined with the proper technique, will help you maximize your vacuum’s ability to keep your home free from dust and dirt.

Features

The features vacuums offer vary, but adjustable height, “full-bag” sensors and variable motor speed are common. All of them affect your vacuum’s performance.

Adjustable height: Many models allow you to adjust the height of the vacuum as you clean different surfaces. But vacuum owners often don’t realize that a lower height setting doesn’t necessarily mean a deeper clean. “If it’s too low, it won’t clean properly,” says vacuum guru Tom Gasko, curator of the Vacuum Cleaner Museum in St. James, Missouri. So how do you know which height is right? “Recline the handle and start the vacuum in its highest position,” Gasko says. “Turn it one notch down until you hear the change in sound—it will become a deeper, throatier sound.” That sound means the brush is sweeping correctly. The team at BISSELL, an AHAM member, recommends a higher setting for thicker, plush carpets, and a lower height for low-pile carpet or bare floor.

Speed settings: Another common assumption is that high speed equals better cleaning. The appropriate speed depends on the surface you’re vacuuming. “If you’re cleaning an area rug, the high speed tends to bunch it under a nozzle,” Gasko says. “The lower speeds work better. Let’s say you have a woolen area rug. Don’t use high speed. You’ll drag the carpet and it will destroy the nap of the rug. Your draperies don’t need near the suction of the shag rug. On your sofa, it can tear the fabric.”

 

“Empty bag” indicator: A “full bag” indicator is great for telling you when it’s time to change the bag. “If that [indicator] window is three-quarters of the way full, that bag is three-quarters of the way through. If you’re vacuuming three rooms and you have a shedding dog, you might want to change the bag.” Bissell recommends emptying bagless vacuums frequently so they don’t overfill. This leads to fewer clogs and better performance. And check your brush, too: hair on the brush roll can decrease its effectiveness and cause stress on the vacuum’s belt. Clean the brush regularly for the best performance.

Attachments: Many vacuums come with a variety of attachments. Some of the more common are crevice tools, turbo brushes, extension wands and dusting brushes. “Use crevice tools and turbo brushes to vacuum upholstery and get in between cushions on the couch,” the BISSELL team says. “Use extension wands to reach dust on ceiling fans, cobwebs in high corners, etc. Dusting brushes can be used to reach around books and items on shelves. Gentle bristles won’t scratch delicate wood surfaces.”

Technique

When you vacuum, do pull back harder than you push? Many people naturally do. They’re unknowingly leaving dirt on the floor. Why?

“Vacuums are designed to be pushed at a specific speed,” Gasko says. “They’re to be propelled forward at 12 inches per second, backwards at six inches per second. Your backward pull has to be slower than your forward push.” Brushes on vacuums rotate forward, from the back to the front. “If you pull it back at half the speed, the brush has time to groom the carpet and sweep all the dirt out of the carpet because you’re going against the direction the brush turns.”

If your vacuum includes swivel, use it to reach those tight areas and corners, BISSELL recommends.

If you’re using a stick vacuum on a bare floor, it’s also a good idea to slow down and give your vacuum enough time to remove the dirt. “People think they can get through their kitchen in less than a minute,” Gasko says. “A bare floor doesn’t mean you can push the vacuum faster.” BISSELL recommends turning off the brush roll when vacuuming hard floors so that debris don’t scatter and brushes don’t damage delicate floors.

How you push the vacuum also matters. You may be using too much arm.

“People will stand and make star-shaped patterns with their arm,” Gasko says. “You’re supposed to hold the vacuum in your hand with your arm not bent.” He recommends walking forward at about 12 inches per second and backing up at half that speed for maximum dirt removal. “Make two passes, one forward and back, at the proper speed. Using your shoulder and elbow is inefficient, and your carpet will be cleaner.” Don’t go too fast, and be methodical in your pace when cleaning high-traffic areas of the home, BISSELL recommends.

Do you use a canister vacuum? If you tend to pull on the hose to get the canister to follow you around the room, there may be a better way. Proper technique involves wrapping the hose around the small of your back and holding it in your left hand. This will allow you to move the canister without pulling on the full length of the hose, Gasko says.

Are you cleaning drapes, furniture, shelves and other higher-up areas? BISSELL suggests cleaning those first, before you vacuum the floor. That way, if dust drifts from the higher spots, you’ll only have to vacuum the floor once.

Rise of the Robots: Robotic Vacuums Now a Floor Care Fixture

Traditional vacuum cleaner with a hose, nozzle and brush versus a modern circular automated low profile unit, high angle view on a shaggy white carpet
Do robots live among your appliances? There’s a growing chance at least one type does. Sales of robotic vacuums and cleaning robots are expected to grow from $981 million in 2013 to $2.6 billion by 2020. And the innovations keep coming. New features like cameras, voice controls and improved navigation have taken robotic vacuums from a novelty to a fixture in floor care.

So what does one need to know before turning over vacuuming duties to a robotic partner? Robots have come a long way in floor care, but they’re still widely considered a supplement to, not a replacement for traditional vacuums. They can’t yet climb stairs, but they can sometimes reach areas that are hard to get to with traditional vacuums, like deep beneath furniture. They’ll take longer to clean a room—about 30 to 90 minutes, depending on the robot and the size of the room—but they can also do it on their own, whether or not you’re there to supervise.

Red robotic vacuum cleaner and smartphone. Smart appliances concept. 3D rendering image.
The hundreds of robotic vacuum models on the market offer different features. They use different methods to find their way around a room, using laser, cameras or infrared sensors. They may have different work capacities or perform better on certain surfaces. Some models use lithium ion batteries, others use nickel metal batteries.

Are you ready to welcome a robot into your home? Follow these tips to create a more hospitable habitat for your new cleaning companion:

Break down barriers: Take a look around the area you’re going to vacuum, and remove any potential obstacles. Even a sock or something smaller on the ground can interrupt cleaning, particularly if the robot tries to vacuum it. Remove any items that could get stuck in your robot’s rollers and cause an error.

Remove the cords: Just as you would with traditional vacuums, make sure the area being cleaned is free of plugs and power cords that the robot may try to vacuum.

Keep it confined: A robotic vacuum goes where you allow it to go. Close doors that might lead it to another area that does not need to be vacuumed, or use the technology features to keep it within a certain range.

Welcome it home: Many robotic vacuums will automatically make their way back to their charging station when their power starts to drop. Put the charging station in an area that’s easy for the robot to access.

Keep the robot clean: Keep your robot’s sensors and other navigation tools free of debris, as it can interfere with navigation. Empty the robot’s dustbin after every use. Make sure filters are clean and replace as necessary.

The next robotic revolution

Robots are slowly making their way beyond vacuuming into areas like mopping and air purification. Automation is becoming part of appliances, with many new models incorporating voice controls and the ability to adapt to our habits. Are there any tasks you would be happy to hand off to a robot? Let us know in the comments!

5 things to consider when buying a vacuum

If you’re serious about keeping your carpets clean and your floors shining, just any vacuum won’t do. The type, features and design of the vacuum are important, but the type of floors and the level of cleaning they’ll require should be your focus when making a decision. Do you have hardwood floors? Standard or ultra-soft carpet? Area rugs? Pets? People with specific allergies in the house? Do you vacuum every day or once a week? Make the wrong decision and you could end up with more of a mess and a vacuum that just takes up space.

Walk into an appliance retail store and you’re likely to come face to face with a plethora of vacuum models. They can be broken down into seven categories:

Lower half of a man wearing shorts vacuuming a tan rug with an upright vacuum as part of his housecleaning chores..
Upright: An upright is likely what comes to mind when you think of a vacuum. It’s a traditional, full-size, pushable format with or without a mechanical brush roll. It will work well and provide deep cleaning capability on many types of carpets, but it often is not the best choice for a house with only hardwood or other bare floors. Most will include attachments like a dusting brush, crevice tool and upholstery cleaner. Some may also include detachable handheld or smaller vacuum units. The key to cleaning carpeted floors is to have suction, air flow and good filtration. It is important to agitate the carpet with a mechanical brush roller at the same time the suction and air flow pick up the dirt and move it into the receptacle or bag.

Woman cleaning with vacuum cleaner, baby sitting on floor and biscuits all around
Canister: Unlike the upright, you won’t push the whole vacuum when using a canister, though they do need to be pulled. Unlike the upright, the canister can be maneuvered for stairs and difficult to reach places. The body is separate from the wand and floor tool, connected by a hose. They’re designed for the ability to be lighter weight when doing above floor cleaning (dusting, crevice cleaning, upholstery cleaning, etc.), but can also provide deep cleaning for carpet.

Man vacuuming and woman on sofa
Stick: Think of these as the everyday cleanup tool for mealtimes, pet hair and spills on hard surfaces and area rugs, but not as much for heavy carpet cleaning. They’re available in both corded and cordless, though there’s a trend toward cordless models.

The female hand holds a portable vacuum cleaner
Handheld: Handheld vacuums are made for smaller clean-ups. They’re often light enough to be operated with one hand, but some larger models may include hoses or attachments to tackle bigger messes. Again, they are available in both corded and cordless, although the cordless ones are more prominent.

Home vacuum cleaning robot in action on genuine wooden floor. Selective focus on robot.
Robotic: They’ll do the cleaning for you. Robotic vacuums are growing in popularity. They can be set to clean for a certain time and some are capable of following certain patterns or mapping a house or room. They don’t have the capacity of the other types of vacuums. They can clean carpets or hard surfaces, but may not have the deep-cleaning power of an upright or canister vacuum.

Wet-Dry: These vacuums are often reserved for the garage or basement but can be used in many places to mop up water spills or to clean up after wet cleaning on concrete or other hard surfaces. The vacuum is specially constructed to be used around water so that the user will not receive an electric shock when used in accordance with the instructions.

Central: These vacuums are installed in one place in the home and a tube is embedded in the walls of a home for routing to the central unit in the garage or basement. Central vacuums use ports located at intervals in the home to access the vacuum. A hose and floor tool can be connected to the ports. The advantage is that all the vacuumed dirt and dust are directed out of the living space of the home.

Now that you know the types of vacuums available, here are five factors you should consider when shopping for a new vacuum:

Ease of pushing: Vacuuming is a physical activity, and you’ll need to think about how much weight you want to push around while cleaning. Some vacuums are light and easy to push. Some will have heavy suction for cleaning deep in the carpet, but may have adjustments to make them easier to operate. Others are heavier and may require more force. If it’s too hard to push, you won’t want to clean. You should also think about how you’ll feel carrying it up and down stairs. Some vacuums use a motorized brush roller that helps to move the vacuum on the floor. Many vacuums make turning around furniture easier through their design. Ask your retailer if you can try it out before you buy it.

Bag or no bag? Bagless and bagged vacuums require somewhat the same level of maintenance. Both must be emptied regularly. A bagless vacuum will free you from having to stock up on vacuum bags, but they still contain one or two filters that need to be cleaned. Bagged vacuums trap the dirt and debris inside a bag and can be carried out for disposal.

Your level of dirt: Do you have pets? You’ll likely need to clean up more hair than anything else. Pet owners often own two vacuums—one for routine cleaning and a separate model for frequent deeper cleaning of pet hair from the surfaces and the right attachments like a turbo brush and crevice tool.

Allergen removal: Both allergy sufferers and pet owners should consider buying a vacuum with a sealed air system that prevents dirt, dander and allergens from escaping the vacuum.

Reliability and durability: Some retailers will have carpet available in store for you to try out a vacuum. Others may allow you to take a model home and try it out. Ask for a demonstration. But in case a demo isn’t possible, study online consumer reviews in advance and look for descriptions of how the vacuum performed on the types of flooring that you have in your home.

Vacuum Bags, Belts and History: Advice from the Curator of the Vacuum Cleaner Museum

Tom Gasko was about eight years old and walking to school when he found his first vacuum. It was a GE Roll-Easy from 1956. He was immediately fascinated.

“It looked like a barrel,” Gasko recalls. “Somebody had thrown it away. My mom said ‘That thing probably has bugs in it.’ I thought it was very interesting.” Gasko took the vacuum apart and figured out how it worked. Friends and neighbors, hearing of his interest, began giving him their old vacuums. He followed his passion into a successful career in vacuum sales, repair and design, and ultimately to his current role as curator and manager of the Vacuum Cleaner Museum and Factory Outlet.

Gasko’s vacuum collection, which began with the GE model, has now grown to nearly 800 and includes nearly every model ever made. To him, the individuality of vacuums makes them stand out among home appliances.

“Every dryer you buy is a square box with a rotating drum,” he says. “The design is pretty much the same. Vacuum cleaners are completely unique. Then, you add on top of that the passion of the door-to-door sales. It’s passion that you have with no other appliance.”

Visitors to the Vacuum Cleaner museum can get a guided tour through Gasko’s collection, and he’ll share details about each model and note how their design reflected the events of the time.

He might point out the Atlas vacuum, released in 1957, whose design evokes the classic Chevy model of the same year.

He’ll show you models from the 1960s, the age of the race to the moon, Star Trek and Lost in Space. This Fairfax model, Gasko says, was designed to resemble Rosie, the robotic maid from “The Jetsons.”

1960sFairfax
The 1970s, the era of Saturday Night Fever can is reflected by this Kirby model. The rake on the front is designed to tackle the strands of that iconic relic of the time, shag carpet.

1976Kirby
It’s safe to say that Gasko is one of the world’s vacuum experts. That designation means he gets a lot of questions from consumers about which vacuum they should buy. There’s no easy answer, as it depends on the home’s flooring, carpet style and cleaning needs.

Vacuums are relatively easy to care for, but Gasko sees widespread misunderstanding among consumers who aren’t aware of the simple steps they can take to keep their vacuum…well, sucking.

“They don’t understand that the removing of the dirt from the machine and filters, and changing the bag, is the best thing they can do to lengthen the life of their machine,” Gasko says. Upright vacuums without bags are common models, he said, but their owners often neglect basic maintenance. “Just because it doesn’t have a bag doesn’t mean it doesn’t have filters,” Gasko says. “Most people don’t know where the filters are or how to clean it. They don’t realize there are one, or two, or in some cases, three filters.” If you don’t clean your vacuum filters, eventually, the suction will disappear. Gasko estimates that about half of the vacuums put out with the trash work just fine. But their owners have failed to clean the filters and believe the vacuum no longer works.

Most filters are washable, Gasko says. He recommends removing the filter every time you empty the canister. Simply rinse it off and allow it to dry for 24 hours before you put it back into the vacuum.

Another simple maintenance step you can take is to change the belt every two years. “I’d estimate 50 percent of vacuums in people’s closets have worn out belts. Everyone waits until it breaks.” Belts usually cost about two dollars, Gasko says. A worn belt means the vacuum’s rotating brush won’t turn at the correct speed, limiting its cleaning power.

Vacuum owners also tend to neglect the attachments that come with the cleaner, Gasko says. “If it’s an upright, it has an onboard hose attachment, an extension wand, a crevice tool, a dusting tool and a furniture tool.” A canister vacuum will have a power head and rotating brush. The attachments can greatly expand the vacuums ability to clean and allow it to tackle different surfaces, like mattresses and furniture. But they too often sit unused in the closet, the casualties of their owners’ reluctance to read an instruction manual, Gasko says.

If you’re in the market, Gasko firmly believes that cordless vacuums are the future of the industry. It’s a safe bet he already has some in his collection. But he’s still on the hunt for a Hoover Model O.  “They only made 239 of them,” he says. Do you have one? Let us know!

Tips to Consider when Buying your Next Vacuum

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Canister or upright? With a bag or without? These are just a few of the questions you might have when trying to decide which vacuum to buy. Finding the right one can be more difficult than you think, especially if have pets, have limited storage space or have to carry the vacuum up a flight of stairs. If you’ve shopped online or in the store then you probably know that vacuums come in a variety of styles to fit every budget – just like cars.

AHAM has assembled some buying tips courtesy of HuffPost Home:

  • Keep in mind what you’ll use your vacuum cleaner for the most: “The toughest job for a vacuum is deep-cleaning carpets, which is what our research says is the number-one job people want in their vacuum. Equally important is being lightweight enough that it’s not hard to push, pull, lift and generally maneuver. Third is durability,” says Consumer Reports Senior Home & Yard Editor, Ed Perratore.
  • DO: Buy a vacuum that works with your lifestyle. “We test for pet-hair pickup and find that some models do very well at getting up what their pet sheds without the hair wrapping around the brush. Neither uprights nor canisters have the edge there. For apartment dwellers, the size of the unit matters a lot. If you have lots of carpets, we recommend bagged uprights since they tend to have the best airflow and suction. If you don’t want to lug around an upright and also maybe vacuum stairs a lot, consider a canister. And for general pickup of spilled dry items and dust, many people also have hand, stick and even robotic vacs–though you can’t count on them for deep-cleaning.”
  • DON’T: Forget that it’s all about HOW you use the vacuum. “There are a few ways to vacuum “wrong.” Never vacuum water or even a wet floor; use a wet/dry vac instead. Change your bag or empty your bin promptly; it affects available airflow. Ditto for the filters; inspect them every couple of months. If you vacuum up something big like a sock, turn the vacuum off right away–besides blocking airflow, you could break the belt, which is there to protect the motor. And if you vacuum a bare floor like wood or laminate and don’t turn off the brush (or don’t have a brush on/off switch), you’ll wear away that floor’s finish over time.”

View the complete article here.

Also, GoodHousekeeping.com has advice on keeping your vacuum running smoothly for years to come. Here are a few of them:

  • What’s the difference between a canister and an upright vacuum?
    A canister vacuum is generally more versatile. Like uprights, canisters handle carpets, but they’re also great at cleaning bare floors, vacuuming stairs and sucking up dirt from corners.
  • Which is better — a vacuum with a bag or a bagless vacuum?
    Neither is better. The Good Housekeeping Institute tests show that both clean equally well. Which you buy depends on personal preference. Bagless cleaners save you the trouble of having to buy extra bags, but they can be messy to empty, and the filters and dust containers must be kept clean. While vacuums with bags keep dust and dirt contained, they are tricky to retrieve an earring or small object that gets sucked up accidentally.
  • Do more amps mean better cleaning?
    If you’re tempted to buy a model with the highest amps, horsepower or watts, you might want to think again. These numbers are simply measurements of the electrical current used by the motor. A vacuum cleaner’s performance depends on airflow, the amount of suction it produces, and other factors including the overall design and attachments.

You can find more Good Housekeeping tips here.